Tag Archives: securestate

SANS Mobile Device Security Summit Recap

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Filed under Mobile Security
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Just a quick post about the SANS Mobile Device Security Summit that I participated in.  Kudos to Kevin Johnson and Tony DeLaGrange from Secure Ideas for helping organize and lead the event.  They did a great job!  If you’ve been to SANS events in the past I assure you that this was much different.  First, there was a great line up which included Rafal Los (HP), Jack Mannino (nVisium Security), Chris Cuevas (Secure Ideas), John Sawyer (InGuardians), Josh Feinblum (The Advisory Board Company) and Daniel Miessler (HP ShadowLabs) to name a few.  Having a lineup of great speakers really made the summit flow as well as it did.

What I liked most about this event was that there were plenty of “real world” talks on how enterprises are deploying and managing mobile deployments.  Real in the “trenches” types of talks.  Here are some of the themes that I heard throughout all the talks:

  • Jailbreaking/Rooting is BAD
  • The OWASP Mobile Top 10 is going to be just as important as the traditional web application OWASP Top 10
  • Mobile Threats are an evolving, moving target.  Security teams have to be quick to adapt to new mobile technology
  • MDM (Mobile Device Management Solutions) are a requirement
  • Apple iOS devices are preferred over Android in the enterprise (seriously, that was the consensus).  No one seems to care about BlackBerry or Windows Mobile devices.  I think only one speaker mentioned Windows Mobile…

Speaking to the last point I find this pretty interesting.  Especially given the fact that Android seems to be beating Apple in regards to market share of devices and app store apps.  I also enjoyed hearing about some of the challenges and pitfalls real IT and security departments are facing.  Many of the speakers talked about some best practices they’ve developed and problems they’ve had.  One of the highlights for me was a talk by Det. Cindy Murphy from the Madison WI Police Department Computer Forensics Unit.  She shared some of her experiences with mobile device forensics and how this evidence holds up in court.  I highly recommend you check out this summit next year, it’s one not to miss!

I should have my slides from the latest version of my talk that I gave at the summit (Attacking & Defending Apple iOS Devices in the Enterprise) in the next day or so.

 

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Top 5 Security Settings for Apple iPhones and iPads

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Filed under Apple, Mobile Security
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Apple mobile devices are among the most popular gadgets today. In fact, Apple reports that 250 million iOS devices have been sold and 18 million apps downloaded. I often find that, while the popularity of these devices increases, many don’t understand the basic security features that Apple makes available to them. Some of you may not even realize that these features exist and how easy they are to use. Let’s walk through the top five security settings for these devices:

#1 – The Passcode
This is the most important security feature of your device. It’s also one of the least configured settings. While it may be a pain to “unlock” your device when you want to use it, it’s also your first line of defense if your device is ever lost or stolen. The key to the passcode is to ensure its complex and greater than 4 characters or digits. Never use simple passcodes like “1234” or your ATM PIN number. The two other settings that you need to set are to “Require Passcode Immediately” and set “Simple Passcode” to OFF. You can find these settings under the “Settings” icon then “Passcode Lock”.

#2 – Erase Data
The erase data functionality adds another layer of security to your device. This function will erase all data after 10 failed passcode attempts. What this means is that if someone steals your device and tries to brute force your passcode, if they enter it incorrectly, the device is erased and returned to the factory default settings. Turn “Erase Data” to ON in the Passcode Lock screen.

#3 – Find My iPhone/iPad
If you ever lose or misplace your iPhone or iPad, “Find My iPhone/iPad” is a very important feature to enable. Simply download the application on your device or access it through iCloud (icloud.com). If your device is iOS 4 or below you will need to use the “MobileMe” (me.com) feature instead of iCloud. Either way, you will need to login with your Apple ID to set it up. You can then send the device a message or alert, locate the device on Google Maps, remotely set a passcode, and remotely erase the device. This feature is invaluable if your device is lost or stolen.

#4 – Backup Encryption
One of the more obscure settings that many users don’t set is the “Encrypt Backup” setting, which is found in iTunes. This setting even applies to the new iCloud service in iOS 5. This setting ensures that the backup of your device is encrypted. It goes without saying, if you can access this backup, the data on your device can be accessed and harvested. For example, earlier last year there was a “feature” in which Geolocation data could be easily harvested from the backup file. This has since been remediated, but just think how much information could be harvested about you through an unencrypted backup file.

#5 – Keep iOS Updated
Making sure that you always have the latest version of Apple iOS on your device is important because Apple is always releasing security updates and implementing new security controls. Simply plug your device into iTunes and you will get prompted to update your phone to the latest version. As a side note, don’t Jailbreak your device! Jailbreaking makes many of the built in security features useless and allows your device to be an easy target for data theft.

Ensuring that you have enabled and configured these security settings on your Apple iOS device is more important than ever. Devices like these are lost or stolen all the time and without taking the proper precautions, your data could be vulnerable. Having conducted Apple iOS device penetration testing assessments at SecureState for our clients, I can tell you how easy it is to break into these devices. It’s easy because the proper basic precautions were not taken. Take five minutes now and enable these settings; you’ll be glad you did.

Cross-posted from the SecureState Blog

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Don’t Drop the SOAP: Real World Web Service Testing for Web Hackers Presentation

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Filed under Application Security, Penetration Testing, Web Services
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Sorry for the long delay on posting the slides from the presentation that myself, Josh Abraham and Kevin Johnson did at Black Hat USA and DEF CON 19.  I’ve uploaded the slides from DEF CON to SlideShare (you can also download a copy there as well) and below are the links to the tools and white paper.  I’m currently in the process of working with OWASP to get the testing methodology put into the next version of the OWASP testing guide (v4).  If you have any comments or bug reports for the tools and vulnerable web services please let Josh and Kevin know, they would appreciate it!

Download the white paper.  Download Josh’s Metasploit modules.  Download Kevin’s vulnerable web services.

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